EWTN Bookmark Briefs

Hello Everyone!

In addition to the interview on EWTN Live with Fr. Pacwa, Doug Keck interviewed me for an episode of EWTN Bookmark.

EWTN has released short video segments entitled “Bookmark Briefs” that features my two books Refractions of Light and Pope Leo XIII and the Prayer to St. Michael.

When the program itself airs, I will let you know. In the meantime, please enjoy the following video briefs:

Refractions of Light:

Pope Leo XIII and the Prayer to St. Michael:

Gaspers’ Interpretations of Fátima

On July 2, 2018, the publication Catholic Family News issued an article on the organization’s web site entitled Sexual Abuse and the Third Secret—A Timely Reminder. The article was written by the managing editor of Catholic Family News, Matthew Gaspers. Among other aims, the article seeks to connect the third part of the secret of Fátima with some recent news on allegations of sexual abuse.

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Fátima and Apostasy: A Response to Michael Lewis

Several months ago, an elderly Fátima scholar was discussing with me the theology presented within Our Lady’s message at Fátima, making a distinction between “high” Fátima theology and “low” Fátima theology. In regard to current events within the Church—particularly those involving Pope Francis—I believe such a distinction can provide some instructive insight.

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The Circumspection of Sr. Lúcia

Chosen souls are often subtle in their speech and Sr. Lúcia of Fátima is no exception. Humble to the core, she did not want to draw attention to herself but keep focused upon God and Our Lady’s message. She did not want to speak about herself or her mystical experiences. How much, then, if at all, did this reluctance influence Sr. Lúcia’s writings on Fátima?

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The Silence of John XXIII and the Third Part of the Secret of Fátima

Silence can be deafening and profound is the sound it makes. When Pope John XXIII read the third part of the secret in August, 1959, he “preferred silence” on the text.[i] It seems strange, almost cruel, that something so anticipated by the Catholic world would receive such treatment.[ii] We are, however, in a better position to understand John’s silence so let us listen to its echoes.

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